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Dispatch Newletter

The WWI Centennial Dispatch is a weekly newsletter that touches the highlights of WWI centennial and the Commission's activities. It is a short and easy way to keep tabs on key happenings. We invite you to subscribe to future issues and to explore the archive of previous issues.

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April 9, 2019

Weishaar tells UA audience that National World War I Memorial design effort was a "wonderful sort of experimentation process"

Joe Weishaar

The architect for the national World War I Memorial in Washington DC told an audience at the University of Arkansas last week that the elation of winning a design competition for a national World War I memorial at age 25 turned at times to cynicism as unexpected obstacles emerged in the months after his design was selected. Click here to read more about the trials that followed the January 2016 design competition win for Weishaar, and how the challenges helped shape the final design in unanticipated ways.


Wreath Ceremony at Cypress Hills National Cemetery for NY WWI heroes

Cypress Hills sign

The upcoming Navy Fleet Week New York 2019 starts Thursday, May 22nd, and this year, the event will have a theme of ‘Remembering America’s World War I Veterans’. As Fleet Week approaches, the United States World War I Centennial Commission will host a commemorative event on May 2nd at historic Cypress Hills National Cemetery. There, we will take a moment to remember some heroes, who remain New Yorkers forever. Click here to read more about these New York Home Town Heroes of WWI, and the pre-Fleet Week ceremony to honor them.


VHP Updates Collections Policy and Scope, Includes Gold Star Voices

Veterans History Project

This past year, the Library of Congress' Veterans History Project has made special effort to collect and preserve the stories of World War I - and they have found remarkable success in the form of donated WWI diaries, journals, and letters home. This effort was so successful, that they have further expanded their materials acceptance policy. In a partnership with our friends at Gold Star Families, the VHP will now also collect, preserve, and make available, the important stories of America’s Gold Star veteran family members. Click here to read more about these changes and expansions to the Veterans History Project.


Important WWI National War Pledge Card found inside wall of house in Pelham, NY

Pelham house

Pelham, NY mobilized during WWI to defend the home front and to support the many young men who fought the war in Europe. Part of that mobilization was to provide monetary support to a national campaign to raise $35,000,000 for the Y.M.C.A.'s National War Work Council that funded efforts to provide comfort and support to American troops, Allied troops, and prisoners of war. Recently, a Pelhamite discovered an unused pledge card, issued by the local Pelham Committee in late 1917 to raise money locally for the National War Work Council, inside the walls of her home. Click here to read more about this remarkable artifact, and see pictures of the unexpected find from a century ago.


"We want to spread to people in America that French people don’t forget what their ancestors made for us."

Lucie Aubert

During the course of World War I, the entire nation of France was affected by the arrival of the two million American men and women serving with the American Expeditionary Force. One place where the memories remain alive is in the Yonne Valley, to the northeast of Paris. Named after the river Yonne, it is one of the eight constituent departments of Bourgogne-Franche-Comté and was the site of the AEF's 16th Training Region. The Doughboys who trained there are well remembered. We were very lucky to speak to one of the leaders of the historical efforts in the region, Lucie Aubert. In addition to their various commemorative efforts, Lucie and her friends have created a website that tells the story of every single one of the 175 American service members who lost their lives in the Yonne, one hundred years ago. Click here to read the entire interview with Lucie, and learn more about the local efforts to honor the Doughboys who helped to save France 100 years ago.


U.S. Mint releases images of struck 2019 American Legion Centennial coins

American Legion Coin

As the American Legion celebrates the centennial of its birth during World War I, the United States Mint has released images of struck examples of the three 2019 American Legion 100th Anniversary commemorative coins.  The Mint is offering Proof and Uncirculated versions of the program’s gold $5 half eagle, silver dollar and copper-nickel clad half dollar. The gold coins are being struck at the West Point Mint with the W Mint mark while the silver dollars will bear the P Mint mark of the Philadelphia Mint where they are being produced. The Proof half dollar will bear the S Mint mark of the San Francisco Mint and the Uncirculated half dollar the D Mint mark of the Denver Mint. Click here to read more from Coin World magazine about the American Legion commemorative coins from the United States Mint.


"It was important for me to let people know what it was like during the year 1918."

Gina Hooten Popp

Author Gina Hooten Popp (left) says "I don’t plan a story, but rather let the story come to and through me. So when Lucky’s Way—my historical fiction novel about a young World War One fighter pilot from Houston, Texas—started to take shape in my imagination, I totally immersed myself in research about The Great War. From non-fiction books and documentaries containing historical facts and timelines to soldier’s diary entries and letters sent back home, I learned about the nuances of this fascinating era." Click here to read more about Lucky's Way, endorsed by the United States World War I Centennial Commission, and Popp's efforts to ensure historical fidelity in the novel.


Barrier Island Center Exhibit of African-American World War I Servicemen Includes Shore Soldiers

Shore Soldier

The Barrier Islands Center in Machipongo, VA is hosting a temporary exhibit on loan from the Library of Virginia, “True Sons of Freedom.” To commemorate World War I, “True Sons of Freedom” uses photographs of African-American soldiers from Virginia who fought overseas to defend freedoms they were denied at home. African-Americans from all parts of the Commonwealth served in the army and navy during World War I. The soldiers highlighted in “True Sons of Freedom” came from locations across Virginia and most worked as farmers or laborers before the conflict. Click here to read more about this historical exhibit on display in the former African-American Almshouse, which now serves as the Education and Community Building.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

Remembering Veterans: Ken Buckles

Ken Buckles

In March 29th's edition of the World War I Centennial News Podcast, Episode 116, host Theo Mayer spoke with Ken Buckles (left), a relative of the last surviving American WWI veteran, Frank Woodruff Buckles, who died in 2011. Ken is the Executive Director of Remembering America's Heroes, an organization dedicated to the memory of the men and women who have served this country. Click here to read the entire interview, including what Ken has to say about his relationship with Frank Buckles during the last several years of his life.

Commission News:
Valor Medal Review Task Force, Part II

Timothy Wescott

In March 29th's edition of the World War I Centennial News Podcast, Episode 116, host Theo Mayer spoke with Park University's Dr. Timothy Wescott (left) and Ashlyn Weber, a history student, about their work with the Commission's Valor Medal Review Task Force. Click here to read the entire interview about Park University's efforts on behalf of the Valor Medals Review Task Force, sponsored by the United States World War I Centennial Commission.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo New

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. 

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

George Creel: Chairman, Committee on Public Information

Episode #117
Highlights: George Creel, Selling the War.

Host - Theo Mayer

100 Years Ago This Week - Host | @ 02:10

The Monroe Doctrine - Host | @ 06:40

April at the Paris Peace Conference - Mike Shuster | @ 10:05

War Memoirs from WWI: “Those We Loved” I.L. Read  - Dr. Edward Lengel | @ 14:00

George Creel: Selling The War, Part 1 - Alan Axelrod | @ 19:20

The Story of Helen Hagan - Yale News & Elizabeth Foxwell | @ 34:30

The Dispatch - Host | @ 43:50


Literature in WWI This Week

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Ellen Lamotte's "The Backwash of War".

Did a Censored Female Writer Inspire Hemingway’s Famous Style?

By Cynthia Wachtell

Virtually everyone has heard of Ernest Hemingway. But you’d be hard-pressed to find someone who knows of Ellen N. La Motte.

According to Cynthia Wachtell, editor of the new edition of Lamotte's formerly-censored novel, The Backwash of War, people should. She is the extraordinary World War I nurse who wrote like Hemingway before Hemingway.

She was arguably the originator of his famous style – the first to write about World War I using spare, understated, declarative prose. Wachtell first published this article in The Conversation but was kind enough to not only let WWrite reprint but also to give some background on her inspiration for studying Lamotte and Hemingway: her grandfather, who was a conscientious objector during WWI.

At WWrite this week: "Ellen Lamotte's The Backwash of War. Did a Censored Female Writer Inspire Hemingway’s Famous Style?"

Behind Their Lines

behind their lines

"To a Young Aviator”

is an apt memorial for American flying ace Raoul Lufbury and all the pilots of the First World War. Aline Kilmer's poem captures the cool courage of the fliers, as well as the solitary loneliness of the job


Doughboy MIA for week of April 8

Henry Powell Daniels

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Monday's Doughboy MIA this week is Private First Class Henry Powell Daniels. Born in the town of Cammer, Georgia, as one of the seven children of William and Sara Daniels, Henry enlisted in the Regular US Army at Columbus Barracks, Ohio on 28 October 1916 and served with Company G of the 37th Infantry Regiment on the Mexican border. Following the declaration of war, he was reassigned on 28 May 1917 to Company F, 28th Infantry Regiment and sent to France with the first contingent of American troops to go over, arriving on 11 June 1917. In France, the 28th became one of the organic regiments to form the new 1st Division, and with them Daniels entered the lines in the Somerville Sector and saw some of the first action of the war. In December, 1917, Private Daniels was promoted to Private First Class. On 28 May 1918 – the one year of his anniversary with the regiment – the first all American offensive of the war was launched against the town of Cantigny. Two days later, on 30 May 1918, Daniels was killed in action outside of cantigny. No other details of his death are known at this time.

Want to help us shed some light on PFC Daniels’s case? Consider making a donation to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks. Remember: A man is only missing if he is forgotten.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Window decal

“Doughboy”
Window Decal

An easy and inexpensive way to let the world know that you are remembering America's Doughboys 100 years later.

Featuring the iconic Doughboy silhouette flanked by barbed wire so prevalent during WWI, you can proudly display this poignant reminder of the sacrifices made by U.S. soldiers.  

A portion of the proceeds from this item will go toward building the National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Double Donations Marines


Ward Everett Duffy

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

 

Ward Everett Duffy

Submitted by: Virginia Ward Duffy McLoughlin {Daughter} and Martha M. Everett {Granddaughter}

Ward Everett Duffy was born around 1891. Ward Duffy served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

The calligraphy ink on my father's journalism degree was barely dry when President Woodrow Wilson declared on April 6, 1917, that the United States would enter World War I. The military needed to enlist and train soldiers – fast. My father had just started his first journalism job with The Evening Herald in Manchester, Connecticut, and his employer didn't want to lose him.

April 30, 1917
To Whom It May Concern:
This is to certify that I have known the bearer, Ward E. Duffy, for the past year and can testify that he is a man of good character and exemplary habits. I hope whoever examines him physically will turn him down, as he is needed on his job.
Elwood S. Ela, The Evening Herald

But patriotism, idealism and a sense of duty stirred in my father. His employer's letter aside, he could have sought an exemption from service as the sole support for his wife, Louise Day Duffy, and their 3-month-old son, David. But my 25-year-old father enlisted to serve his country.

Read Ward Everett Duffy's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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April 2, 2019


New scale model maquette of the National WWI Memorial sculpture

Pangolin maquette detail

Sculptor Sabin Howard has made an important new development on the new National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC. Working with another world-class, high-tech, sculptural imaging team -- this one at Pangolin Editions Foundry in the UK -- Sabin has been able to create a new, smaller, highly-detailed sculptural maquette of the final WWI Memorial design that is being developed to restore and enhance DC's Pershing Park. This maquette will be part of the Centennial Commission's progress-update presentation for the next regulatory review meeting with the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts (CFA) in April. Click here to read the entire story and watch video of the new maquette.


John Purroy Mitchel: The "Boy Mayor" of New York City who died in World War I

Mitchel

As you read in last week's Dispatch, Fleet Week New York City in May will have a WWI theme. The story of America's involvement in the war is very much a NYC story. Even before the US enter the war, the horrible Black Tom explosion damaged the Statue of Liberty, and the ill-fated Lusitania departed on her last voyage from Pier 54, on the West Side. Some of the most famous units of the war were NYC units — The Rainbow Division, the Liberty Division, the Harlem HellFighters, and the Lost Battalion. As we roll toward Fleet Week NYC, we will share some stories that show the city’s close connection to the war. This first story is about the wartime mayor, John Purroy Mitchel. After failing to win re-election in 1917, he enlisted in the Army Air Service as a flying cadet. Click here to read the entire story about the second youngest person elected mayor, who was often referred to as “The Boy Mayor of New York,” and came to a tragic end in World War I.


Congressman Cleaver Introduces Bipartisan Bill to Award Congressional Gold Medal to the ‘Hello Girls’ of WWI

Emanuel Cleaver

Congressman Emanuel Cleaver, II (D-MO) on March 28 introduced H.R. 1953, the “Hello Girls” Congressional Gold Medal Act of 2019, a bipartisan bill that would honor over 220 American women who served as phone operators with the U.S. Army Signal Corps in France during World War I. As phone operators, these women played a pivotal role in connecting American and French forces on the front lines of battle, helping to translate and efficiently communicate strategy. H.R. 1953 would award these women, the Hello Girls as they came to be known, with the Congressional Gold Medal—the highest civilian award bestowed by Congress—for their service and subsequent sixty-year fight for veteran status and the benefits that are earned with it. Click here to read more about Congressman Cleaver's resolution, which has already attracted four co-sponsors. The measure tracks a similar bill introduced in the Senate by U.S. Senators Jon Tester (D-Mont.) and Marsha Blackburn (R-Tenn.).


"I feel a direct personal connection to our Doughboys"

Jared Shank

Over the years, we have met several members of our WWI community who have gotten personally involved in hands-on projects, projects that help them to really embrace our WWI history. They include trench work restorations, tabletop diorama creations, reenactor impersonations, restorations of trains/tanks/ trucks/artillery pieces/ambulances/warships, etc. We love these projects -- and we always find interesting stories behind those people who undertake them. Our latest such project is being done by our friend Jared Shank, of Ohio. Jared is an Army veteran, and he only just started working on an incredible find -- a WWI-era light artillery piece with a remarkable history. We were lucky to share some time with Jared, and to hear his story--click here to read the complete interview.


1919: Peace? New Exhibition at the National WWI Museum and Memorial

Peace 1919 logo

The Armistice on Nov. 11, 1918 ended fighting on the Western Front, but the war—nor its lasting effects—did not end even with the signing of the Treaty of Paris at Versailles on June 28, 1919. The "1919: Peace?" exhibit at the National World War I Museum and Memorial explores the aftermath and the legacy of the Versailles treaty signing. The exhibit opens April 2, and runs through March 1, 2020. Click here to read more about this in-depth examination of how "the war transformed the world, but left a legacy of unresolved issues and conflict."


Immigrants swell US troops in WWI

Helmet

When America entered WWI in 1917, American men between the ages of 15 and 45 were required to register for the draft. This included not only U.S. citizens, but also resident aliens who had filed a declaration of intent to become a citizen. This presented a problem since many had immigrated, in part, to escape the long military service required by many European nations, according to the National Park Service. “Registrants for the draft who claimed exemption on the ground of being aliens,” said the Daily Dispatch Nov. 18, 1918, “and there were many in this country, will now have a long time in which to ponder the advisability of their claims. Such persons are forever barred from becoming citizens of the U.S.” Click here to read more about the 500,000 immigrants from 46 nations who made the choice to serve in America’s armed forces during WWI, making up 18 percent of the troops.


One Century Ago: Bringing 'Em Back after "The Navy Put 'Em Across"

The Navy Put 'Em Across poster

Naval historians of the First World War tend to gravitate towards great battles such as Jutland and the ferociously frustrating Dardanelles campaign, but these dramatic naval and littoral actions had nothing to do with the U.S. Navy's most decisive contribution to the war: delivering the two-million-man American Expeditionary Force (AEF) to Europe. By this time one hundred years ago, what was then known as the Great War had been over for months, but many of the American Soldiers and Marines who fought its final, bloody campaigns were still coming home. Click here to read more about how the U.S. Navy put an entire American army across the Atlantic, a feat inconceivable to European leaders on all sides of the conflict before the Navy actually accomplished it, and then "brought 'em back again" in 1919.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo New

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. 

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Frank Buckles

Episode #116
Highlights: Frank Buckles, The Last Doughboy!

Episode #116
Host - Theo Mayer

100 Years Ago This Week
- Host | @ 02:15

Colonial Self Determination?
- Mike Shuster | @ 11:35

Revisit Wilson’s 14 points
- Host | @ 15:50

Doris Kellogg, Mechanic, Nurse, & more
- Dr. Edward Lengel | @ 20:10

Congressional Gold Medal for Hello Girls?
- Host | @ 26:00

Valor Medal Review Task Force
- Dr. Westcott & Ashlyn Weber | @ 27:40

Frank Buckles stimulates legacy
- Ken Buckles | @ 33:45

Big Prize - TransAtlantic Flight
- Host | @ 40:50

Dispatch highlights
- Host | @ 44:00


Literature in WWI This Week

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WWI Touches Pablo Picasso

By David Allen Sullivan

While award-winning poet David Allen Sullivan visited the Paris Louvre exhibition, "Disasters of War 1800-2014," he was most struck by a painting that seemed almost irrelevant to the other artistic representations of battle carnage in the museum: A Family by the Sea by Pablo Picasso.

Sullivan, who has written poetry from the hard lens of the Iraq War in his book, "Every Seed of the Pomegranate", contemplates WWI, Picasso, and the ethics of subtlety and beauty in the face of violence. Read his poem, "WWI Touches Picasso," published for the first time on WWrite this week!

Behind Their Lines

behind their lines

American doughboy Joyce Kilmer wrote "Rouge Bouquet" to honor the sacrifice of 19 U.S. soldiers killed by German shellfire in March of 1918.

Just months later, the poem was read over Kilmer's grave, after his death at the Second Battle of the Marne in July. You can read the poem here: listen for its echoes of "Taps."


Doughboy MIA for week of April 1

Aaron O. Holt

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Monday's Doughboy MIA this week is Private First Class Aaron O. Holt. One of nine children of Benjamin Holt, Aaron Holt was born in Waycross, Georgia in May, 1898 and enlisted at Ft. Thomas, Kentucky, on 26 March 1917. He first trained with Company C, 4th Infantry before being transferred on 09 June 1917 to Company C, 59th Infantry, 4th Division. Holt arrived overseas with the 4th Division on 03 May 1918 and, as a ‘regular army’ division, was soon in combat. That summer in the ‘Hell-hole Valley of the Vesle’, Holt was killed in action on 12 August 1918. He left behind a young widow who would follow him into death in 1925. No other details of his death are known at this time.

Want to help us shed some light on PFC Holt’s case? Consider making a donation to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks. Remember: A man is only missing if he is forgotten.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Flag large

World War I Centennial Flag

On December 19, 2014, Congress passed legislation designating Pershing Park in the District of Columbia as a national World War One Memorial. The Act authorizes the World War One Centennial Commission to further honor the service of members of the United States Armed Forces in World War One by developing the Pershing Park Site.

This WW1 Centennial Flag is made of durable nylon and measures 3x5'.  This flag has the iconic Doughboy silhouette digitally screened onto it and has 2 brass grommets to hang the flag.    A portion of the proceeds from the sale of this item are designated for national WWI Memorial. You can show your support, and help promote the Memorial, by proudly displaying your custom flag.

Certificate of Authenticity as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial is included. 

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Double Donations Nieuport-28


Boyd Willard Stone

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Boyd Willard Stone

 

Submitted by: Donald Stone {Grandson}

Boyd Willard Stone born around 1901. Boyd Stone served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

My paternal grandpa, Boyd Willard Stone, enlisted as a private in the United States Army on September 17, 1917 at the age of 16 (yes, he fibbed about his age).

After basic training at Camp Colt in Gettysburg, PA he was ultimately assigned to Co. B, 5th Machine Gun Bn., 2nd Infantry Div.

His World War I Victory Medal shows service in the following engagements: AISNE, AISNE MARNE, ST. MIKIEL, MEUSE ARGONE, DEFENSIVE SECTOR and CHATEAU THIERRY. He received two "wound stripes": gassed in the Troyon Sector 3/27/18, and a shrapnel wound at Chateau Thierry. He was also awarded the Silver Star.

Read Boyd Willard Stone's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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March 26, 2019

2019 Fleet Week NYC has WWI Theme

Fleet Week 2019 logo

The Fleet is coming to NYC -- and World War I will be a part! The much-loved annual U.S. Navy Fleet Week NYC will descend on the greater New York area from May 22-28, 2019. Events will kick off with the traditional parade of ships past the Statue of Liberty, and will blossom into an incredible series of activities, exhibits, displays, tours, concerts, and appearances. This year, there will be added excitement, as the Secretary of the Navy has declared that "World War I" will be included as a special theme. The U.S. World War I Centennial Commission is taking the lead on its own series of activities, aimed at teaching people about the American men and women who served. Among the World War I-related events will be exhibits of era equipment and uniforms by living-history reenactors, as well as commemorative events, and displays of the sculpture for our new National World War I Memorial in Washington DC. Click here to read more about Fleet Week 2019 and the World War I activities that will be part of the big week in NYC.


WWI Memorial Designer Joe Weishaar welcomed by UA School of Architecture & Design and Honors College April 3

Weishaar UA video

Joe Weishaar, a native of Fayetteville and a 2013 graduate of the University of Arkansas'  Fay Jones School of Architecture and Design, will return to campus to present a free public lecture, “To End All Wars: The Fight for the National WWI Memorial,” on Wednesday, April 3. The UA published a thoughtful video  interview and article with and about Weishaar this week, focused on his efforts as the designer of the National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC. Click here to watch the video, and read the entire article.


The Navy’s First Enlisted Women, 1917-1918

Navy female CPO

Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels began preparing for the United States’ entry into World War I before Congress declared war in April 1917. While assessing the administrative, material, personnel, strategic other requirements, Daniels discovered that the Civil Service Department could not provide an adequate number of workers. He was delighted to learn, however, that there were no legal barriers to recruiting women, as the Naval Reserve Act of 1916 permitted any U.S. citizen to serve. Rear Admiral Leigh C. Palmer, Chief of the Bureau of Navigation, announced via his 19 March 1917 memo that the Navy was enlisting women for primarily clerical duties. Click here to read more about how the addition of female sailors led to a U.S. Navy "stronger, more efficient and more capable" in World War I and today.


USS Olympia and the World War I Unknown Soldier is April 3 lecture topic

WWI Unknown descending from Olympia

2021 is the 100th anniversary of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. In an April 3 lunchtime lecture at the U.S. Capitol Historical Society in Washington, DC, John Brady, president of the board of directors, Flagship Olympia Foundation, will share information about the USS Olympia‘s role in transporting the Unknown Soldier home from Europe and his subsequent lying in state at the U.S. Capitol prior to being buried at Arlington National Cemetery. Click here to read more about this upcoming event in Washington, DC in April.


"A Prince In Sky-Blue Uniform" is French salute to WWI aviator Norman Prince

Prince aircraft dedication snip

On April 19, 2019 the French Cultural Center of Boston will present a live theatre play entitled " A Prince In Sky-Blue Uniform: Paying Tribute to War Hero Norman Prince" at 6:30 p.m. at the Center. The emotional play, written by Jean-Claude Redonnet and directed by Richard Sewell, pays tribute to Massachusetts-born war hero Norman Prince, portrayed by David Bliss. Prince is one of the many Americans who fought and perished for the freedom of France and the World during World War I. Click here to read more about this commemorative presentation by the French Cultural Center of Boston.


Dayton, Ohio photographer has important role in WWI documentary

Dan Patterson

Aviation photographer, historian and author Dan Patterson is one of the producers and the art director of a 20-minute documentary version for The United States World War One Centennial Commission titled “The Lafayette Escadrille.” The film makers collected original film footage, photographs and historical records and conducted interviews with descendants of the pilots. Film of replica WWI aircraft in dogfights over the Pennsylvania countryside is used to give a pilot’s perspective of the close combat between the fragile airplanes. Click here to read more about how this Ohioan got involved in bringing an important story of America in World War I to the movie screen.


NEH Grant Helps Connecticut to Remember World War I

CT soldiers

With the help of an NEH grant, the Connecticut State Library has documented more than 450 men’s and women’s experiences in World War I. Over the course of four years, the Remembering World War One project collected nearly 5,000 images and artifacts illustrating these individuals’ stories. This extensive and deeply personal collection was amassed through 47 public digitization events hosted by partner institutions throughout the state. Remembering World War One stands out as an exceptionally comprehensive state-wide commemoration of the war’s centennial; it garnered two nationally-syndicated AP stories and numerous local television and radio spots. Click here to read more about how the Nutmeg State commemorated the centennial of World War I.


A Century of Service with the U.S. Navy Photo Archive

NHHC logo

January 2019 marked the 100-year anniversary of the creation of the U.S. Navy’s Photo Archive, currently held at the Naval History and Heritage Command at the Washington Navy Yard. The Navy’s collection of historical records predates the National Archives (established in 1934) and originally began in the Office of Naval Records and Library (NR&L). The first expansion of the activities of the Historical Section had been the establishment on Jan. 1, 1919 of a Pictorial Branch whose purpose was to collect and file under proper references photographs illustrating activities of U.S. and foreign navies. A follow-up in the form of an ALNAV 86 dated March 14, 1919 requested that copies of photographs and motion pictures of naval activities, ships, bases, personnel, and incidents taken during the war be forwarded to the Historical Section. Click here to read more about a World War I era decision that created a priceless national photographic treasure.


An Oregonian's part in the Legion's birth

American Legion 100 logo

He was a beloved soldier, family man, Oregonian and visionary co-founder of The American Legion. And George A. White’s legacy infused a gathering of veterans, families and dignitaries who packed American Legion Post 10 in Albany, Ore., March 15 to mark the 100th birthday of the nation’s largest veterans service organization “He was there from the very beginning,” Oregon Alternate National Executive Committee member Andy Millar said. “He was a true Legionnaire.” “I get choked up because of my dad,” added Steve Adams, first vice commander of the Department of Oregon, who began accompanying his father on visits to American Legion posts when he was 6 years old. “He made me promise to never forget World War I because that’s when The American Legion was born.” Click here to read more about how a World War I soldier from Oregon helped found America's largest veterans organization.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

The Great War and the Great Depression: Exploring the Connection
with Professor Maury Klein

Maury Klein

In March 15th's edition of the World War I Centennial News Podcast, Episode 114, host Theo Mayer spoke with history professor and author Maury Klein about the often forgotten connection between two of the most catastrophic events of the 20th century. Click here to read the transcipt of this discussion about connecting the dots to between World War I and the giant stock market crash of 1929 and the following Great Depression.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo New

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. 

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Donut Girl or Lassie in WWI Tin Helmet holding a bowl of confections

Episode #115
Highlights: Congressional Medals & Donuts

Host - Theo Mayer

100 Years Ago This Week - Host | @ 02:10

Mandates? Colonies by Another Name - Mike Shuster | @ 11:05

Donuts & the YMCA Volunteers - Patri O’Gan | @ 15:00

Suffragette Turned WWI Gov. Agent - Dr. Edward Lengel | @ 21:20

Valor Medal Review Task Force - Zachary Austin | @ 27:00

Congressional Gold Medal for the Hello Girls - Dr. Elizabeth Cobbs | @ 33:00

National Medal of Honor Day 3/25 - Host | @ 41:20

Dispatch Newsletter Highlights - Host | @ 43:55


Literature in WWI This Week

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"The End of Patriarchy:" Pat Barker’s WWI Novel, Regeneration

By Jennifer Orth-Veillon, Blog Curator

Legendary novelist, Pat Barker, winner of the 1995 Man Booker Prize for her trilogy, Regeneration, based on the life of British male soldiers in WWI, announced in a January interview with The Guardian that "we're at the end of patriarchy and I’m fine with that as long as it’s remembered that among the victims of patriarchy the vast majority are men."

In this last post of Women's History Month in which WWrite has showcased women war writers,  blog curator Jennifer Orth-Veillon discusses the meaning of Barker's statement in the context of Regeneration, a novel that takes place in Scotland's Craiglockhart Psychiatric Hospital and features the fictional characters poets Siegfried Sassoon, Wilfred Owen, and their renowned war psychiatrist, W.H.R. Rivers. Read about Barker and her monumental literary work on WWI at WWrite this week!

Behind Their Lines

behind their lines

In the aftermath of the First World War, Americans began to realize how much had been lost. 

American poet Daniel Sargent, a doughboy who survived the war, remembers his dead comrades. Read more of his story in "Through Names I Walk." 


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

US Army Woolen Blanket

U.S. Army Woolen Blanket

Keep warm while showing your American pride with this classic green woolen U.S. Army blanket.

Still proudly Made in the USA by Woolrich, Inc., the oldest continuously operating woolen mill in the United States since 1830, the blankets were originally purchased by the U.S. military to supply our troops. Designed to be used by soldiers in the barracks, this Limited Edition blanket features a heat-marked “U.S.” emblem on the center and an exclusive fabric garment label commemorating the U.S. centennial of World War One. A portion of the proceeds from the sale of this item will help fund the National WW1 Memorial in Washington, D.C. Fabrics and Features: 66”W x 84” L; 24 oz. 65% wool/35% recycled wool. Overseamed at all four sides. Made in USA.

A Certificate of Authenticity as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial is included.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Double Donation nurses


Mary Darnaby Henton

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Mary Darnaby Henton

 

Submitted by: Zack Austin

Mary Darnaby Henton born around 1894. Mary Henton served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

Darnaby (as she preferred to be called) was born the fifth child of farmers James Henton and Bettie Hampton in Versailles, Kentucky in 1894.

She was one of 7,600 women to volunteer for 100 positions advertised by the War Department in newspapers throughout the US calling for “patriotic women” to serve as “full-fledged soldier[s]” willing to face the dangers of submarine warfare and aerial bombardment. She followed her brother Sam, already serving as a Battalion Sergeant Major in the 326th Field Artillery Regiment, into the service, proud to be a member of America’s first unit of female soldiers outside of the Nurse Corps—the “Hello Girls”.

The first Hello Girls took the Army oath on January 15, 1918. By operating switchboards relaying orders and providing real-time translation from French to English, the women would “do as much to help win the war as the men in khaki who would go ‘over the top’” according to the War Department.

Read Mary Darnaby Hinton's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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March 19, 2019

Weishaar in NW Arkansas Democrat Gazette

"To not honor those men and women for their service and sacrifice would be a discredit to their memories."

Architect Joe Weishaar, designer of the national World War I Memorial in Washington, D.C., will be going home April 3 to speak on "To End All Wars: The Fight for the National World War I Memorial" as part of the Honors College Invites lecture series at the University of Arkansas, his alma materWeishaar was interviewed by the Northwest Arkansas Democrat Gazette newspaper in anticipation of his appearance at the University next month. Click here to read the entire insightful interview about how Weishaar's world has changed since winning the design competition for the Memorial.


Women played vital roles in World War I

WWI Museum Women i WWI snip

At the time of the First World War, most women were barred from voting or serving in military combat roles. Many saw the war as an opportunity to not only serve their countries but to gain more rights and independence. With millions of men away from home, women filled manufacturing and agricultural positions on the home front. Others provided support on the front lines as nurses, doctors, ambulance drivers, translators and, in rare cases, on the battlefield. Click here to read more about how American women mobilized for the war effort a century ago.


The American Legion Centennial: It all began in Paris a century ago

American Legion logo

The American Legion organization’s 55 departments and nearly 12,500 posts across the country and around the world are celebrating a century of service to community, state and nation that began in Paris March 15-17, 1919, when war-weary members of the American Expeditionary Forces gathered for a “morale conference” that led to the creation of what would become The American Legion. Only 300 troops were expected to attend. Officially, 463 registered. Some have estimated that more than 1,000 came and went, with or without orders, during the weekend that launched a century of accomplishments unforeseeable, if not unimaginable, at the time. Click here to read more about how a chaotic and informal wartime meeting was the genesis of the nation's largest veterans organization a century ago this month.


“Yeomanettes” paved the way for women of all Navy ratings today

Yeomanette

In order to fill severe clerical shortages caused by World War I, the U.S. Navy approved the enlistment of women in 1917. The Naval Reserve Act of 1916 made no specific gender requirements for yeomen, enlisted personnel who fulfill administrative and clerical duties. So either by deliberate omission or accident, the act opened the opportunity to enlist women. One of the first through the door on March 17, 1917 was Loretta Perfectus Walsh, who became the first active-duty female in the Navy who wasn’t a nurse. The newly-enlisted Sailors were given the rating Yeoman (F), with the “F” designating female. More popularly referred to as “yeomanettes,” the majority worked in clerical positions, but they also served as translators, draftsmen, fingerprint experts, ship camouflage designers and recruiting agents. Click here to read more about how these women pioneers in military service set the standard for all who followed.


"We encourage folks to share this information with educators."

Who They Were toolkit cover

The Centennial Commission's efforts in the area of Education are among our most important endeavors. Ultimately, the mission of the Centennial Commission is to educate people, especially our coming generations, as the stories and lessons of World War I are their inheritance. We are thrilled to help our Education Department to roll out a new tool for educators -- a brief video entitled "Who We Were", which helps to describe the various resources available to teachers and students of World War I. We spoke with our friend Ryan Hegg about the new video. Ryan has long been with the Centennial Commission as a volunteer and as a staffer, and he was part of the production of this new video.


A General's family WWI story: From segregation to command in 100 years

BGen Beagle

Pvt. Walter Beagles arrived at Camp Jackson, South Carolina, in 1918, an African American draftee in a segregated Army that relegated black soldiers to labor battalions out of a prejudiced notion that they couldn’t fight. More than 100 years later, his great-grandson now serves as the base’s 51st commanding general. Brig. Gen. Milford Beagle, Jr., a combat veteran who took command last June, admits that it gets to him, knowing he’s serving where his ancestor served but under vastly different circumstances. “It does become pretty surreal to know that the gates my great-grandfather came through are the same gates I come through,” Beagle said. Click here to read this entire fascinating article about a family's World War I saga.


World War I letters give Chesterfield students hands-on history lesson

Chesterfield student

Some sixth graders at Providence Middle School in Chesterfield County are getting a hands-on history lesson thanks to dozens of century-old letters from World War I.  Every other day Ms. Jennifer Covais’ students arrive to crunch numbers as they immerse themselves in the past using authentic dispatches written from war-torn France during WW I. The author, Johnny Cawthra, was a disabled clerk with American Express who could not serve in the military because he was blind in one eye. “They love writing. It's an elective. It is an honors writing class,” Covais said. "I like to make memories with my kids."  Click here to read more about (and watch the video of) how students are transcribing Cawthra’s observations that range from his visits with wounded soldiers in a hospital and watching President Wilson to witnessing the ravages of war.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

Spotlight on the Media:
'The Hello Girls' Documentary
Executive Producer Jim Theres

James Theres

In March 8th's edition of the World War I Centennial News Podcast, Episode 113, host Theo Mayer spoke with Jim Theres, executive producer of 'The Hello Girls,' about the remarkable history of these women and his acclaimed film highlighting their service. Just this month, Theres received a special recognition award at the Army Women's Foundation Hall of Fame induction ceremony, for spotlighting America's first female soldiers. Click here to read a transcript of this entire interview, and find out where you can see the Hello Girls movie yourself.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo New

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. 

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Bankrupt investor Walter Thornton  roadster for $100 cash

Episode #114
The Great War / Great Depression Connection

Host - Theo Mayer
100 Years Ago This Week - Host | @ 02:00

Imperialism at the Peace Conference - Mike Shuster | @ 10:55

The Great War and the Great Depression Connection - Prof. Maury Klein | @ 15:15

A Pioneering American Woman Doctor in WWI - Dr. Edward Lengel | @ 22:30

No Seat at the Table: Ireland - Host | @ 26:55

“Official Bulletin” Back Online - Host | @ 30:05

Cantata: And Crimson Roses Once Again Be Fair - Alejandro Valdez & Joseph Turrin | @ 32:55

Winner: 2019 Canine Hero of the Year - Host | @ 41:15

Speaking WWI: Dog Fight | @ 42:35


Literature in WWI This Week

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Army of Shadows

By Roxana Robinson

When award-winning author Roxana Robinson was writing her critically acclaimed book about a veteran of the Iraq war, "Sparta", she only allowed herself to read one war novel: Erich Maria Remarque's "All Quiet on the Western Front".
For Robinson, it "beautifully resolves the problems of scale and language" with a narrative that is "both beautiful and desolate."
Read Robinson's reflections on contemporary war writing through the lens of Remarque's WWI classic novel at WWrite this week!

Behind Their Lines

behind their lines

Where do we go from here, girls?

BEHIND THEIR LINES examines American women's responses to the changes in society that followed World War I.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Morning Java Candle Mug

Morning Java Candle Mug

These replica tin mugs have been upcycled from regular coffee mugs into coffee candles.

The "Morning Java" scent will fill the room with a wonderful coffee aroma that includes just a hint of chocolate.

A portion of the proceeds from the sale of this item is designated for completing the National WWI Memorial in Washington D.C.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Double Donation Red Cross ambulance


John "Jack" Thomas Nilles

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

John "Jack" Thomas Nilles

Submitted by: Patti Jacobsen {great-niece}

John "Jack" Thomas Nilles born around 1889. John "Jack" Nilles served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

My great-uncle, John Thomas “Jack” Nilles was born 24 March 1889 in Two Rivers, Wisconsin, the eighth and youngest child of Peter Hubert Nilles and Anna Margaret (Beth) Nilles. He attended St. Luke’s Catholic School through the eighth grade.

By 1909, Jack decided to learn the lumbering and building material business and he started at the bottom in order to gain practical knowledge in his field. He worked at Schmitt Lumber in Two Rivers and later at Farrell Lumber in Algoma, Wisconsin.

He was socially active, a member of the Columbus Club and served as club secretary for a number of years. As a musician, he played cornet with the local band and attended local dances.

Jack registered for the draft in the first registration on 5 June 1917: for all men between ages 21 and 30. His registration states that no one was dependent on him for support.

Read John "Jack" Thomas Nilles' entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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March 12, 2019

Sculptor Sabin Howard on a mission to effect lasting social progress through art

Sculpture women snip

A brand-new “Great Women Sculpture Initiative” (GWSI), which aims to change the way women are portrayed in sculpture, is celebrating female leadership in human rights, civil rights, and women’s rights. The sculptor for the national World War I Memorial in Washington, DC, Sabin Howard, is a key player in the movement. Howard and his associates have started the process to create a body of work of female sculptures to be shown as a traveling exhibit to museums. A book and documentary about the process of creation will follow.  Click here to read the entire Architectural Digest article about this women-focused artistic effort.


Hough, Cobbs, Theres honored by U.S. Army Women’s Hall of Fame for Hello Girls work 

Mark Hough

Attorney Mark Hough (left), who succeeded in 1978 in lobbying for Congressional recognition for the Hello Girls' military service, nearly fifty years after their return from WWI, was one of three people recognized by the U.S. Army Women’s Foundation as they inducted, collectively, the U.S. Army Telephone Operators of World War I -- AKA the "Hello Girls" -- into the Army Women’s Hall of Fame March 7th on Capitol Hill. Along with Hough, also recognized were Elizabeth Cobbs, author of the definitive "Hello Girls" book, and Jim Theres, director of the award-winning documentary, “The Hello Girls”. Click here to read more about the ceremonies honoring the Hello Girls, and the three special partners of the United States World War I Centennial Commission in the Task Force for gaining Congressional Gold Medal recognition for the Hello Girls.

Cobb OpEd Washington Post

Also last week, Elizabeth Cobbs brought the Hello Girls message to a broader public audience. Cobbs published an OpEd in the Washington Post that urged Congress to support the measure introduced by Senators Jon Tester (D-Mont.) and Marsha Blackburn (R-Tenn.) to honor the women of the WWI U.S. Army Signal Corps Signal Corps with the Congressional Gold Medal.  Click here to read the OpEd and find out more about the proposed Congressional Gold Medal.


Restored memorial in Hudson, OH recognizes 81 veterans of World War I

Hudson, OH memorial

A restored World War I memorial in Hudson, Ohio recognizes 81 veterans of Great War, with help from U.S. World War I Centennial Commission partner reenactors Seth and Garrett Moore. The restoration of this memorial was part of the Commission's 100 Cities/100 Memorials program. Click here to read more about the unveiling of the restored bronze tablet containing the names of 80 men and one woman from Hudson who served in World War I.


Navy Celebrates 100th Anniversary of the Board of Decorations and Medals

Department of he Navy

The Navy celebrates the centennial of the Board of Decorations and Medals. Founded March 6, 1919, the board was established by order of then-Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels to standardize the awarding of medals to service members for extraordinary acts of heroism or distinguished service. The Board was established following the World War I Armistice, and Congress’ creation in February 1919 of two new decorations: The Navy Cross and the Navy Distinguished Service Medal. Click here to read more about how the century-old Board of Decorations and Medals "guarantees authenticity of the high tributes we bestow on our Nation’s warfighters.”


“We’re Home—Now What?” Exhibition at National WWI Museum & Memorial

When You Go Home book

A new Exhibit opening today at the National World War I Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, MO looks at the challenging transition for American armed forces personnel from War-time duty to civilian life after World War I through archival materials. The U.S. government offered financial, vocational and social resources to the nearly 5 million servicemen and women who began demobilizing in 1919 after nearly half served overseas in the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF). Click here to read more about this new look at the government and private efforts 100 years ago to the assist returning veteran’s in becoming a “civvie” again.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

Remembering Veterans:
Writer Elizabeth Foxwell on the Roles & Experiences of Women in the Great War

Elizabeth Foxwell

In March 8th's edition of the World War I Centennial News Podcast, Episode 113, host Theo Mayer spoke with writer Elizabeth Foxwell about stories and experiences of female service in WWI, many of which have been neglected or forgotten. Foxwell, a journalist and author focusing on the stories and neglected accounts of and by women who served in various roles in the war. Click here to read a transcript of the entire interview.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo New

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

The Fingerprint Girls of WWI 2

Episode 113
Highlights: Women's Diverse Roles

Host - Theo Mayer

100 Years Ago This Week - Host | @02:15

Getting to a League Of Nations Draft - Mike Shuster | @10:35

Being Hospitalized in France - Dr. Edward Lengel | @14:30

“Digital Technology and the Sculptor’s Art” Part 2 - Host | @20:50

Courtesy of the author: Traci Slatton

K9 Veterans Day and Our Poll | @35:15

Women’s Diverse Roles in WWI - Elizabeth Foxwell | @37:15

Hello Girls Documentary Update - Jim Theres | @45:05


Literature in WWI This Week

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Writing in the Post-War World of Agatha Christie

By Christopher Huang

Agatha Christie has won the world over with her fabulous detective novels and her star character, Hercule Poirot.

Less renowned is her time in WWI as a nurse, an experience that, without a doubt, inspired her narrative universe. Christopher Huang, the author of A Gentleman's Murder, a detective story about a murder in a gentlemen's club of British 1914-1918 veterans, discusses the influence of WWI on Agatha Christie's work. Uncover Huang's post about one of the greatest detective writers of all time at WWrite this week!


 

Behind Their Lines

behind their lines

From Behind Their Lines

Celebrate Pi-Day (3.14) this week with an American doughboy poem from WWI: "Home Is Where the Pie Is!".


Doughboy MIA for week of March 11

Private Percy E. Southard

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Monday's Doughboy MIA this week is Private Percy E. Southard. Born in March, 1897, the son of Henry and Minerva Southard of Reidsville, North Carolina, Private Percy Southard was already a member of the 3rd Regiment of Infantry, North Carolina National Guard, when America entered WW1 in April, 1917. His unit – Company G of Reidsville – was federalized on 06AUG1917 and sent to Camp Sevier, South Carolina to prepare for overseas service. There the company became Company G, 120th Infantry Regiment, 30th Division. Fighting strength for the units of the 30th were then built up by drafts of men coming in from Camps Jackson and Taylor. Private Southard shipped ‘Over There’ on 12MAY1918 aboard the transport Bohemian, departing from Boston, Mass. Overseas, the division was brigaded with the British, first in the Ypres Sector up in Belgium. By August, however, they had been transferred to the British 4th Brigade, in the Somme Sector, to take part in the coming ‘Final Offensive.’

At 5:50 am on 29SEPT1918, the 120th Infantry was sent over the top in the area of Bellicourt, near the St. Quentin Canal. It was a section of the line the Germans believed impossible to break and the fighting was intense. Nevertheless, by 11:45 am that day  the 120th had taken Bellicourt. The price had been high though – of the 250 man Company G, some 120 of them had been killed or wounded. One of the killed was Private Percy Southard. Nothing further is known of his case at this time.

His death was announced in the papers back home on 01NOV1918, while his father did not receive official word until 12NOV1918. His mother had died (ostensibly of TB) in June, 1918, while Percy was overseas.

Want to help solve Pvt. Southard’s case? Consider making a donation to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Collector's Bundle

World War I Collector's Bundle Sale

Collect all commemorative coins and lapel pins in one purchase, with a nice discount! 

  • Coins: Each piece is die-struck, bronze alloy, with nice gravity (unlike cheaper zinc coins)
  • Enamel inlay provides premium detailing and finish
  • Each coin and pin comes with its own commemorative packaging, adding value and gifting appeal.

This collection includes a WWI Centennial Coin, Centennial Lapel Pin, Bells of Peace Commemorative Coin, Bells of Peace Commemorative Lapel Pin, and U.S. Victory Lapel Pin.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Double Donation women aviators


Vincent A. Luza

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Vincent A. Luza

Submitted by: Lydia Luza Mousner {granddaughter}

Vincent A. Luza was born in 1895. Vincent Luza served in World War I with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1920.

Story of Service

Vincent Aloysius Luza was born on May 2, 1895 in Bryan, Brazos County, Texas. His parents, Vincent and Mary Luza, and grandparents, Baltazar and Francis Gibble Luza, immigrated through the Port of Galveston in 1873 from Praha, Moravia. He was also the grandson of Frank and Angelina (Honozak) Luza. V.A.

Luza attended Allen Academy in Bryan, Texas. He was drafted into the army in 1918 and was assigned to the 344th Field Artillery in Battery F at Camp Travis, TX.

On March 4, 1918, the regiment with its two batteries of guns and six hundred-odd animals marched out to Camp Bullis (Leon Springs) for target practice. It was at Camp Bullis that reconnaissance gun squads were first able to put into practice their gun drill, which had in the beginning been executed on make-shift carriages of wood and later perfected by work on the eight three-inch pieces which had been assigned to the regiment.

Read Vincent A. Luza's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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