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Dispatch Newletter

The WWI Centennial Dispatch is a weekly newsletter that touches the highlights of WWI centennial and the Commission's activities. It is a short and easy way to keep tabs on key happenings. We invite you to subscribe to future issues and to explore the archive of previous issues.

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November 20, 2018

Service at Washington National Cathedral on November 11 honors Americans' service, sacrifices in World War I 

WNC service November 11

It was the day of commemoration that we had all looked forward to -- the Centennial of the Armistice. People filled Washington National Cathedral on Sunday 11 November, to honor Americans' sacrifices in World War I. In a sacred service that recalled the thousands of lives lost and the joy that followed news of the armistice, members of the U.S. World War One Centennial Commission and other officials paid tribute to a generation largely forgotten in the wake of later conflicts. At 11 a.m. – exactly 100 years after hostilities ceased, at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month -- the crowd fell silent and the cathedral's bourdon bell tolled 21 times. Click here to read more about the sacred service, and other Commission activities in Washington, DC on November 11.


Bells of Peace Ring Across the United States on November 11, 2018

Bells of Peace at NWWIM&M

From Washington, DC, to Honolulu, HI, and everywhere in between, plus U.S. military facilities worldwide, and aboard ships at sea, Bells of Peace tolled on Sunday, November 11, in solemn remembrance of the nation’s sacrifices in World War I, and in honor of all veterans. Participating organizations and individuals numbered in the tens of thousands. Over 23,000 people downloaded the Bells of Peace Smartphone App. Among those who tolled bells were veterans’ organizations, houses of worship, veterans’ cemeteries, patriotic and civic associations, universities, national and state parks, museums, senior living homes, and even restaurants. The World War I Centennial Commission received proclamations from the states, U.S. territories, and the District of Columbia in support of Bells of Peace. Nationwide, 120 cities, counties, and towns also issued proclamations. Click here to read more about how Bells of Peace tolled across the nation and around the world.


NFL teams honor World War I veterans

Halas

Sunday, 11 November, was a day of remembrance around the world, for those who served and were lost during World War I. Among those who helped to mark the occasion were various teams from the National Football League. You see, Sunday 11 November was also NFL Gameday -- which served as a great public platform to tell the story of our veterans. In Chicago, the Bears football team had special reason to mark the day, as the team's original founder and owner, George Halas (left), served in the Navy during World War I. Click here to read more about how the Bears and other NFL teams helped mark the centennial of the Armistice in stadiums across the nation.


Doughboys remembered, saluted in 2018 New York City Veterans Day Parade

Doughboy color guard NYC parade 11112018

The East Coast Doughboys and the Long Island Living History Association were out in force November 11 to participate in the 2018 NYC Veterans Day Parade. The parade, produced every year by the United War Veterans Council, took on an important World War I theme, as it fell on the day of the Armistice Centennial. Some 110 living history reenactors mustered for the parade -- to include people portraying Americans and Allies, soldiers, generals, nurses, and even WWI-era civilians. They brought with them a variety of gear, to include cars, trucks, and bicycles. Click here to read more about Doughboys on parade in NYC, and see spectacular photos of the participants.


A special Armistice tribute in New London, WI for a missing Doughboy

Laplander with McGrath plaque

Robert Laplander, Founder and Director of the Doughboy MIA project of the U.S. World War One Centennial Commission, and author of Finding the Lost Battalion, was an honored guest of the family of MIA Doughboy Eugene Michael McGrath on November 11 in Wisconsin, to help unveil a plaque honoring the soldier at his place of birth.  Laplander's 15 years of research to determine McGrath's fate was the genesis of the Doughboy MIA effort, but his efforts had a powerful effect on McGrath's family as well. Click here to read more about how the search for a missing Doughboy helped a family find itself again.


100 years after his death, family of Irish immigrant World War I soldier finally receives his Purple Heart

Pvt. Michael Walsh

U.S. Army Pvt. Michael Walsh's family had waited over 100 years for this moment: the opportunity to honor their fallen hero. Walsh, an immigrant from Ireland, served with the American Expeditionary Forces in France through some of the bloodiest fighting of World War I. He would be one of the last men in his company killed during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive in the fall of 1918 in which more than 26,000 Americans died. After Walsh's death, his family was never told details about what happened to him during the war, and they were never given the medals that Walsh so rightfully earned. Thanks to the World War I Centennial Commission's partner Purple Hearts Reunited, Walsh's nieces and nephews -- some now third generation -- received his Purple Heart award in Glasnevin cemetery in Dublin last week.  Click here to read more about the long-delayed delivery of the medal to Walsh's family, another successful chapter in the mission of Purple Hearts Reunited.


100 years ago - Breaking News of the 'False Armistice' rocks America

False Armistice

The 'real' Armistice agreement with Germany, signed on Monday 11 November 1918, finally ended the First World War with a cease-fire starting at 11 o’clock that morning. It was the last of the September-November 1918 armistices between the belligerents, and was celebrated with enormous joy and relief in the Allied countries. But four days earlier, on Thursday 7 November, false news of an armistice agreement had provoked similar rejoicing by millions of people across the world. Celebrated in France, Britain, the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Mexico, Cuba, Argentina, and probably elsewhere, this was the so-called False Armistice. Click here to read more about how misunderstanding created premature relief for warring nations. And see the Podcast article below for more information on the False Armistice.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

100 Years Ago: Run-Up To The Armistice 

False Armistice reaction NYC

From November 11th's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 97: Theo Mayer takes us through the dramatic events of the week leading up to November 11th, 1918. With her allies already out of the war, Germany's government begins to break down. Negotiations between the Allies and Germany continue for several days. Finally, on the 11th, the War That Changed the World ceases and the Allied nations celebrate. Click here to read a complete transcript of this podcast.

The Armistice 

Daily Missourian close clip

Few documents in history can match the significance of the Armistice, the agreement that officially ended the Great War on Allied terms. Clearly, the Armistice represented a massive blow to German prestige, and together with the Treaty of Versailles, exacted a heavy punishment on a broken nation. Sadly, the peace that began with the signing of the Armistice would be shattered just two decades later. Click here to hear the entire Armistice, as read by host Theo Mayer in Episode 97 of the World War 1 Centennial News Podcast:


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo new

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Sacred Service Special Image

Episode #98
Special:
Sacred Service

This special episode brings you the inspiring sound of World War I Armistice Day Sacred Service, a multi-denominational service honoring the Centennial of the WWI Armistice, from the WWI Centennial Commission in partnership with Washington National Cathedral.

Download the Sacred Service program (a keepsake in its own right) at this link.


Literature in WWI This Week

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A Story of Regeneration - Hemingway's "Big Two-Hearted River"

According to writer Brandon Caro, Ernest Hemingway's "Two Big-Hearted River," tells the tale of WWI soldier who comes home and seeks to regenerate his soul after the prolonged trauma of combat through the story of a fishing trip.

In this week's WWrite post, Caro, who is the author of the novel, Old Silk Road, and has published in The New York Times, The Daily Beast, and  Whitehot Magazine of Contemporary Art,talks about the ways this story resonates with his own experience as a veteran of Afghanistan. 

Read Brandon Caro's compelling post,  "A Story of Regeneration - Hemingway's "Big Two-Hearted River" at WWrite this week!

Behind Their Lines

behind their lines

Remembrance Day, 1921

Across time and national boundaries, veterans have often returned from war only to face economic hardships that seem to minimize their sacrifices.  "Remembrance Day, 1921" poignantly gives voice to dead soldiers who sympathize with their comrades who have survived war.  .


Doughboy MIA for week of Nov. 19

Private Lorton Register

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Monday's MIA this week is Private Lorton Register. Born in Gilmer County, Georgia, Lorton Webster Register entered the Regular Army at Ft. Thomas, Kentucky, on April 15th, 1917. Attached to the 18th Infantry/1st Division, he was among the first troops to set foot in France. He was killed in action on the night of March 1st, 1918, while at a listening post ahead of the lines. Nothing else is currently known about this case.

Would you like to help us solve Private Register’s case? Can you spare ten dollars? Then why not give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Lest We Forget Book Cover

"Lest We Forget: The Great War" is brand new way for you to help build America’s WWI Memorial, in Washington DC. At the same time, you get to enjoy a very special, colorful, inspiring and lasting souvenir of the centennial!

The book features nearly 350 high-quality images, an introduction by Sir Hew Strachan and text by historian Michael W. Robbins. The project is dedicated to the Centennial and produced by The Pritzker Military Museum and Library along with the WW1 Centennial Commission.

Importantly, when you get this visual remembrance of the "War that Changed The World"  - a full ½ of the proceeds go to building the Memorial!

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


John August Kiecker

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org 

John August Kiecker


Submitted by:
Janet L. Rajala {Grand Niece}

John August Kiecker born around 1890. John Kiecker served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1917.

Story of Service

John August Kiecker served as a corporal in the American Expeditionary Force of the U.S. Army under General John J. Pershing. Although I have few records of his service, the following is an excerpt from a letter he wrote to his nephew, John Lietzau, (my uncle) on April 20, 1919 from Quernignyrot, France.

"Well, John, I am still in France but soon will leave for Germany where we'll enter the occupation troops and therefore have to hold our end down until everything is settled. The first peace treaty is supposed to be signed by the 25th. Inst. probably the soldiers will be lessened according to peace negotiations. Just think today it is Easter sunday and no eggs for today. Eggs, milk and sweet deserts you don't get in the army. Yesterday we had a beautiful day, sunshine all day, mind you. This occurs not often in France. I must tell you that I am teaching school here in the army and therefore am not drilling at present. Four boys from our company got a discharge from the Army and now be home or on their way home."

Read John August Kiecker's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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November 13, 2018

Cathedral November 11 A

(Above) Visitors take part in an all-denominational Sacred Service at the Washington National Cathedral, on Sunday, Nov. 11, 2018 in Washington. The Cathedral and the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission partnered for the service remembering the 4.7 million Americans who served in World War I, and to honor the role the U.S. military has played in preserving peace and liberty in the world for the past 100 years. The Centennial Commission is a Congressional commission that provides public education about American's in the war. They are also creating the new National World War I Memorial in Washington DC The memorial is being built through donation. The Centennial Commission plans to dedicate this new memorial on November 11th, 2021. See full coverage of the Armistice Centennial Events in DISPATCH next week. (Kevin Wolf/AP Images for US World War 1 Centennial Commission)

Cathedral November 11 B

Commissioners of the United States World War I Centennial Commission were joined by other dignitaries, religious leaders, grandchildren of famous WWI figures, and other notables during an all-denominational Sacred Service at the Washington National Cathedral, on Sunday, Nov. 11, 2018 in Washington, DC. The service honored all Americans who served in World War I, and commemorated the centennial of the Armistice that ended the fighting in Europe on November 11, 1918. See full coverage of the Armistice Centennial Events in DISPATCH next week. (Kevin Wolf/AP Images for US World War 1 Centennial Commission)


Bells of Peace Tolled Across Nation

PACFLT bell

The nation tolled its bells on November 11 in honor of the service and sacrifice of its World War I veterans, and all who have served in its Armed Forces. The Washington National Cathedral led the national bell tolling with 21 somber, muffled tolls.  Also in Washington, D.C., the Netherlands Carillon near Arlington Cemetery, the Old Post Office bell on Pennsylvania Avenue, and the Robert Taft Carillon on the U.S. Capitol participated in the toll. Military installations everywhere paused to toll bells at the direction of the Secretaries of the Army, Navy, and Air Force and the Commandant of the Coast Guard. Click here to read more about how the Bells of Peace project rang out across the nation and around the world.


NYC Parks Commemorates Armistice Centennial through 103 City Memorials

Highbridge Doughboy

In honor of the centennial of the World War I armistice on November 11, NYC Parks’ Citywide Monuments Conservation Program (CMCP) staff joined forces with park partners this fall to refurbish and care for several monuments, including Father Duffy in Times Square, the Pleasant Plains Memorial on Staten Island, the Abingdon Square Doughboy in Greenwich Village, and the Carroll Park monument in Brooklyn. With 103 memorials of all shapes and sizes erected in the aftermath of World War I, Parks has one of the most prevalent collections of memorials to this important moment in history. Memorials can be found across the city, with 21 in Brooklyn, 18 in the Bronx, 23 in Manhattan, 12 on Staten Island, and 29 in Queens. Click here to read more about the NYC WWI memorials, and the restoration work that has been done to preserve them.


WWI: The War That Saved Democracy

Making World Safe for Democracy

One hundred years ago on November 11, the First World War mercifully drew to a close. Across a devastated Western Front, British Tommies and French Poilus emerged from the trenches as their German adversaries capitulated. What few remember is that over two million American Doughboys stood in the Allied lines when the guns finally fell silent on November 11, 1918, after four years of slaughter that claimed 18 million lives. Daniel J. Samet, a foreign affairs researcher based in Washington, D.C., writes that if our nation forgets the events of World War One, "we also overlook one of its key consequences: the rescue of democracy around the world." Click here to read this thoughtful essay on the key legacy of World War I.


Special WWI Issue of American Heritage

American Heritage Magazine

To mark the Armistice Centennial, the World War I Centennial Commission's commemorative partners, American Heritage magazine, have a new special issue that is all about World War I. There’s some important writing here, including an essay that Herbert Hoover wrote in 1958 about his experiences as an aide to Wilson at the peace talks after World War I. This important first-person narrative candidly details the difficulties that Wilson faced in what Hoover called “the greatest drama of intellectual leadership in all history.” Click here to read more about the important contents of the special issue of American Heritage Magazine.


WWI Flag Exhibit at Virginia War Museum

Virginia War Museum

The Virginia War Museum will be running a temporary exhibit "Flags of War: Virginia’s First World War Regimental Colors" until November 18, 2018. The temporary exhibit will feature the regimental flags of Virginia’s units that served overseas in the 42nd, 29th and 80th Divisions as well as African American Engineer Battalions and Coast Artillery units. This is the first time ever that all of the flags have been displayed for public viewing. Click here to read more about this once in a lifetime opportunity to view these sacred artifacts of Virginia’s role in the Great War.


Italian observance for World War I Armistice Day's 100th anniversary

Italian centennial wreath

The nation of Italy commemorated the 100th anniversary of the end of the war, this week. In official ceremonies in Rome and in Trieste, Italy's president Sergio Mattaella recalled Europe’s history, and urged young people to remember the conflict's lessons while striving for peaceful coexistence. “To celebrate together the end of the war and to jointly honor the fallen — all the fallen — signifies to reiterate with force, all together, that over the path of war, we prefer to develop friendship and collaboration,” he said at a ceremony in Trieste, a port city not far from some of the deadliest battles between Italian soldiers and troops of the Austrian-Hungarian empire. Click here to read more about these events, part of a week of observances for the centenary of Armistice Day in Italy.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo New

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Armistice hoorah with fido

Episode 97
Highlights: The Run-up to the Armistice

100 Years Ago… The Run-up to the Armistice - Host | @02:10

Was America crucial to winning the war? - Prof. Geoffrey Wawro | @09:10

A reading of the Armistice - Host | @18:50

The 369th Experience - performance | @39:05


Literature in WWI This Week

Wwrite Blog Logo

Veterans Day/Armistice Day Centennial Day WWrite Interview with Pulitzer Prize Winner Robert Olen Butler on the Christopher Marlowe Cobb Thriller Series and the Importance of WWI.

For Veterans Day and the Armistice Day Centennial, WWrite has had the honor to speak with Robert Olen Butler. Butler, who has been called the “best American living writer.” Butler won the Pulitzer Prize in Fiction in 1993 and the F. Scott Fitzgerald Award for Outstanding Achievement in American Literature in 2013. A Vietnam veteran and a former reporter, Butler unites war and journalism in his Christopher Marlowe Cobb espionage thriller series. Four books trace the journey of American spy, Kit Cobb, as he navigates his way through the most important aspects of the WWI-era. The Hot Country(2012), The Star of Istanbul (2013), The Empire of the Night (2014), and Paris in the Dark (2018), take the characters and plot through the Mexican Civil War, the sinking of the Lusitania, the use of Zeppelins, and trench warfare. Butler is best known for his literary fiction, but in this interview, he explains the equally-intricate, equally-literary process of writing spy novels against the historical tectonic shifts of 1914-1918, a time, he says, closely resembles our present era. 

Listen to the fascinating interview at WWrite here today!


Doughboy MIA for week of November 11

Richard Parks

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Monday's MIA this week is Sergeant Richard Parks. Born in Gilmer County, Georgia, Sergeant Parks enlisted on September 11th, 1916 at Columbus Barracks, Ohio, and served on the Mexican Border before going overseas with Company L/9th Infantry Regiment/2nd Division. Sergeant Parks served through the battle at Belleau Wood, but was hit during the attack at Soissons by a high explosive shell on July 18th, 1918. He later died of his wounds. Nothing else is known of his case at this time.

Would you like to help us solve Sergeant Parks’ case? Can you spare just ten dollars? Why not give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Honoring the Doughboys book

Honoring the Doughboys Book

The Great War may have ended 100 years ago, but the ways in which it influences and affects the generations today are diverse and fascinating. Upon receiving the diary of his grandfather, a World War I veteran, writer and photographer Jeffrey Lowdermilk was inspired to honor the memory of George A. Carlson by traversing the same journey he took across Europe, reliving the experiences by visiting the towns, battlefields, and landscapes described in the diary. He has since published a book, Honoring The Doughboys: Following My Grandfather’s WWI Diary, describing his journey,  with contemporary photographs of the places he visited as well as diary excerpts. In addition, Mr. Lowdermilk has donated several copies of Honoring the Doughboys to be sold as Official Centennial Merchandise to benefit the Centennial Commission’s Memorial Fund.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


Albert J. Lentz

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

 

Albert J. Lentz

Submitted by: Mark A. Snell and Eric Lindblade

Albert J. Lentz born around 1895. Albert Lentz served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1915 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

Private Albert J. Lentz of Company D, 18th Infantry, 1st Division, was the first soldier from Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, to be killed-in-action during World War I.

Lentz fell near Cantigny, France on April 26, 1918, a month before the seminal American offensive of the war.

Albert had moved to Chicago about three years earlier but his parents, Israel and Susannah, still resided in Gettysburg at the time of Albert’s death.

Ironically, Private Lentz spent part of his childhood living in the house that today is known as “General Lee’s Headquarters,” which in July 1863 was owned by the widow Mrs. Mary Thompson.

Read Albert J. Lent's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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November 6, 2018 

Bells of Peace reverse

Bell Tolling Time Is Here! Bells of Peace to ring out November 11 across nation

Over 10,000 people and organizations have signed up for the Bells of Peace project, promising to toll bells on November 11, 2018 at 11:00 a.m. local time to commemorate the Centennial of the Armistice and the service and sacrifice of the nation’s veterans. Bells will be tolled 21 times, at 5 second intervals, across the nation and wherever Americans gather to honor their veterans. It’s not too late to register and participate! Download the free app on the App Store or Google Play, and register and upload images of your community’s commemoration event. Or, register on our website at ww1cc.org/bells. And click here to find out what other organizations nationwide are participating in Bells of Peace next Sunday, November 11, including the National Museum of the Marine Corps, and many others.


"A First Look" offers detailed tour of new National WWI Memorial in Washington, DC

First Look banner

From November 8-12, the "First Look Pavilion" provides an all day immersive multimedia presentation of the coming National World War I Memorial, at the location of its future home in Washington, DC. The Pavilion will feature large graphics, video, and physical display to provide you with  "A First Look" at what the memorial will be, offer you some insight into how it has come about, and show the Memorial's current status. You'll also learn how you can participate in its ultimate creation, including video taping your reaction and thoughts after your "First Look." With your visit to the First Look Pavilion, we want to leave you with a clear concept and vision of this wonderful tribute to the men and women who, 100 years ago, helped shape the world we live in today. Click here to learn more about the First Look Pavilion, including hours of operation, and how you can support the Memorial.

The Memorial site will be open to the public daily beginning with a presentation of colors at 8 a.m. and concluding with “Taps” at sunset daily, November 8-12. The “First Look” program will also include a series of special events. You can attend the Special Events in person by registering for free tickets, or watch via live video stream here if you are not in the DC area. Click here to find out more about "A First Look" this week.


The Remarkable World War I Story
of Colonel Charles Young's Ride

Colonel Charles Young

When the United States entered World War I, segregation was entrenched in military culture as well as civilian society. It put barriers up to prevent African Americans from enlisting. Despite this, about 380,000 African Americans served in the U.S. military during the war. Colonel Charles Young, of Wilberforce, Ohio, was the highest-ranking African American Army officer when American joined World War I in 1917. As such, Young was a remarkable success story. But despite an impressive leadership record, the Army refused Young’s request to command troops in Europe. Military leaders told him he was not healthy enough to serve. To prove his fitness, Young made an incredible horseback journey that is still being honored 100 years later. Click here to find out more about Colonel Young's  ride.


Marine Iraq Vet Secures Corrected Headstone for Great-Uncle Killed in WWI

Turley headstone

The century-old wrong done to a Marine private fatally wounded on the last day of battle in World War I will finally be made right this coming Veterans Day at Arlington National Cemetery, thanks to another Marine who worked to correct the record on his behalf. Arlington officials have approved a small ceremony on Nov. 11 at the grave of Marine Pvt. Joseph Otto Turley in Section 18, site 1345, to mark the installation of a new headstone with his correct date of death: Nov. 12, 1918. For Garrett Anderson, Turley's great-nephew and a Marine veteran of Fallujah, it's the culmination of an undertaking that required him to delve into U.S. and family history to unearth the true story of his uncle's service. Click here to read the entire story of how a modern day Marine kept faith with a fellow Marine from World War I.


World War I Centennial Ceremony Marks American Operations in Belgium

Fountain at Flanders Field Cemetery

Flanders Field American Cemetery in Belgium hosted a ceremony on October 27, 2018 to mark the 100th anniversary of American operations in Belgium during World War I. Featured speaker was the Vice Chair of the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission Edwin Fountain (left). In his remarks, he talked about the partnership between our two countries, and also told the story of two Americans who served in WWI: one an American literary legend after the war, and his younger brother, who remained in Belgium forever. Click here to read about the memorial services, and the remarkable story of two brothers who served.


Honor Your WWI Ancestor with a Personalized WWI Coin Display

Coin Display

You can now purchase the limited edition US Mint World War I Commemorative Coin, in combination with our specially-designed display stand, personalized with information about your WWI ancestor. This will make a great collectible gift for family members and descendants of those who served in World War I. Personalization can include: rank, full name, enlisted date, deceased date, unit/decorations, battles, cemetery, etc. If you have already purchased the Commemorative Coin from the US Mint, you can also order just the personalized display. Both the combo set and display alone are available at https://shop.worldwar1centennial.org (click on US Mint Commemorative Coin at the top navigation bar). Supplies are limited. Proceeds from the sale of this item go towards funding the building of the National World War One Memorial in Washington DC.


Natick armory dedicated to Medal of Honor recipient from South Boston

Michael J. Perkins

One fateful October day a century ago during World War I, Private First Class Michael J. Perkins crawled up to a nest of enemy machine gunners that were throwing grenades at his platoon and waited for just the right moment. When the Germans opened the door, he tossed a bomb inside. Then forced his way in and attacked the machine gun crews, and single-handedly forced them to surrender. The courage that the South Boston war hero displayed on the battlefield was recalled last week when the Massachusetts National Guard dedicated an armory in his honor. Click here to read more about Michael Perkins, and the WWI heroism that led to the naming of the armory in his honor.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

Remembering Veterans: Carolyn Timbie on Grace Banker and the Hello Girls

Grace Banker.

In October 26th's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 95, host Theo Mayer spoke with Carolyn Timbie, granddaughter of prominent Hello Girl Grace Banker. In the interview, Ms. Timbie answers questions about her grandmother's remarkable story, and about her own personal  journey through France following her grandmother's footsteps. Click here to read a transcript of the inspiring interview.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo new

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Skeleton on battlefield

Episode #96
Highlights: November 1918 Overview

Host: Theo Mayer

Preview of podcast over the coming weeks | @00:20
November 1918 Overview - Dr. Edward Lengel, Katherine Akey, Theo Mayer | @02:40
Maneuvering both military and diplomatic - Mike Shuster | @18:15
WWI WarTech: The Wristwatch - Host | @21:55
Commission News: The coming week of commemoration - Host | @24:30
Arlington County WWI Commemoration Task Force - Dr. Allison Finkelstein | @26:00
No Armistice from the flu - David Pietrusza | @34:45
100 Cities / 100 Memorials’ effect on Arizona - Neil Urban | @42:30
Speaking WWI: Foxhole - Host | @49:05
The Buzz: Social Media selections - Katherine Akey | @50:35


Literature in WWI This Week

Wwrite Blog Logo

A Distant Field: America's Great War Highlanders

The literary centennial week kicks off with bagpipes and kilts.

WWrite takes a look at RJ MacDonald’s WWI historical novel, A Distant Field, which will be released on November 11, 2018. A former US Marine and Royal Air Force Reservist and veteran of Libya and Iraq, MacDonald has written the first in a series that follows the characters, Stuart and Ross McReynolds, Scots-Americans who survive the sinking of the Lusitania.

Together with four Irishmen, a Canadian, and a young English officer, they join Scotland’s Seaforth Highlanders and head towards the bloody battlefields of WWI. Read the preview and behind-the-scenes look at this unprecedented literary perspective of the Great War on WWrite this week!

Behind Their Lines

Marion Angus

Following the Scottish theme, the "Behind Their Lines" Blog this weeks looks at Ballad of Remembrance. Marion Angus's poem "Remembrance Day" tells of the heart-ache that traditional ballads evoked after the Great War.  This forgotten Scottish poet had a “genius for telling a story in a few verses, of almost unbearable poignancy.”


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Commemorative watch

Armistice 1918 WWI Commemorative Watch

This 1918 limited edition of numbered watches by Col&MacArthur (Belgium) honor those American sol­diers who valiantly fought for our freedom. Behind its sleek design and unalterable symbols, the Armistice 1918 watch commemorates the date of November 11, 1918 - the end of The Great War.

  • Two (2) Year Manufacturer's Guarantee
  • Includes deluxe packaging with a leaflet telling the story
  • Only 1918 watches made. Limited Edition with Serial Number
  • American buyers: This timepiece is Swiss made in batches and will begin shipping to US around Dec. 1, 2018, just in time for Christmas giving.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


George Wiley Byrd

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

George Wiley Byrd


Submitted by:
COL Victor H. Stephenson {Cousin}

George Wiley Byrd was born around 1893. George Byrd served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

PFC George Wiley Byrd (5/17/1893 - 7/15/1918) son of Samuel Randall Byrd and Mary Jane "Sissie" Roberts.

PFC George Wiley Byrd, 3rd Trench Mortar Battery, 3rd Artillery Brigade, 3rd Division. Killed in Action near Fossoy, France on July 15, 1918. He died in one of the most famous battles of WWI. The evening of July 14th found the 3rd Trench Mortar Battery with six mortars in position along south bank of Marne opposite Glands, with working party digging pits for remaining Mortars near Mezy.

At midnight on 14 July 1918, the 3rd Division earned lasting distinction. Engaged in the Aisne-Marne Offensive as a member of the American Expeditionary Force (AEF) to Europe, the 3rd Division was protecting the French capital of Paris with a position on the banks of the Marne River.

Read George Wiley Byrd's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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October 30, 2018 

Public WWI Centennial events in the Metro Washington, DC area Nov. 8-11

First Look vertical

Washington, DC will be the site of a number of remarkable World War I-themed events, exhibits, and activities during the days leading up to, and beyond, the Armistice Centennial. The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission is honoring the more than 4 million Americans who served in during WWI, and the 116,525 men and women who sacrificed their lives, with a “First Look at the National World War l Memorial” program between November 8 and 12, 2018. The Memorial site will be open to the public each day beginning with a presentation of colors at 9 a.m. and concluding with “Taps” at sunset daily. The “First Look Pavilion” will be open 11 am to 5 pm each day. Click here to read more about A First Look, and all the other commemorative events presented by the Commission and other organizations in DC.


National WWI Museum and Memorial Commemorates the Centennial of the World War I Armistice Nov. 1-11, 2018 

Mueums snip

Firing on the First World War’s Western Front ended on Nov. 11, 1918. This year marks 100 years since the stillness fell across the battlefields of Europe on the “the 11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month.” To commemorate the end of World War I, President Woodrow Wilson officially recognized Nov. 11 as Armistice Day – a day of somber remembrance recognized around the world, with many stopping for a moment of silence at the 11th hour of this day to honor those who brought about the end of the “Great War.” The National WWI Museum and Memorial will capture the world’s attention with activities for all ages to commemorate the end of the war, beginning Nov. 1 through the centennial of the World War I Armistice on Nov. 11. Click here to read more about the big list of commemorative activities scheduled at the Museum.


The historic Liberty Bell in Philadelphia is onboard as the Honorary Bell of Peace

Liberty Bell

The World War I Centennial Commission and the National Park Service have designated the Liberty Bell in Philadelphia as the Honorary Bell of Peace to commemorate the Centennial of the Armistice on November 11, as part of the Commission's nationwide Bells of Peace project. The Liberty Bell, the most prominent and revered bell in the nation, is on display in Philadelphia at the National Park Service’s Independence Park. Click here to read more about the Liberty Bell, and the plans at Independence Hall in Philadelphia to participate in Bells of Peace.


Trench recreation opens near site of WWI trench training at Fort Benning, GA

Fort Benning trench exhibit

As part of the garrison's centennial celebration Oct. 19, 2018, Fort Benning, Georgia, officially opened a recreation of the training trenches the U.S. Army Infantry School used on post nearly 100 years ago. The new trench, which the Directorate of Public Works dug out recently, is meant to educate visitors about the post's previous training mission. It is a short walk from a small portion of the original training trenches that many decades had weathered and overgrown. Camp Benning was established at a site near Columbus, Georgia, Oct. 19, 1918, after the Infantry School staff and students arrived from Fort Sill, Oklahoma. Part of the training they conducted was in trench warfare. Click here to read more about the new trench exhibit, and about Ft. Benning's important role in training U.S> Army personnel in WWI.


American Legion Post 43 in Los Angeles and the California World War I Task Force co-host WWI Armistice Centennial event

California WWI Cenetnnial Task Force Logo

The California World War I Centennial Task Force and the American Legion Post 43 in Los Angeles are teaming up for a special Armistice Centennial Event—and You’re Invited! The California World War One Armistice Centennial Commemoration Event takes place on Monday, November 12th, 2018, 1:30 p.m. at American Legion Hollywood Post 43, 2035 N Highland Avenue, Los Angeles 90068. The event is Free.  Refreshments will be provided. Presenters at the event will showcase period newspaper articles and text from those engaged in the war effort. Music from the era will also be performed. Click here to read more about this commemorative event, and the California World War I Centennial Task Force.


World War I Armistice Film Festival ordering opportunities close tomorrow!

Film Festival Posters

LAST CHANCE TO ORDER...

The Armistice Film Festival order window is closing at 5pm Eastern on Wednesday, October 31.

We are excited by the many festival hosts who are holding this unique Veterans Day Weekend event. Your communities are sure to appreciate this special - and not insubstantial - effort to bring information, education and entertainment about WWI into the centennial of the Armistice.

Festivals include:  Several city tour - RI | Friday Harbor, WA | Irwin, PA | Muscle Shoals, AL | Watford City, ND | Harrington, WA | Austin, MN | Brownsville, OR | Fredericksburg, VA | Newburgh, NY | Lynchburg, VA | Washington, DC | Marysville, CA | Wayland, NY | Honolulu, HI | Brooklyn Center, MN | Livonia, NY | Bryan, TX | Los Angeles, CA |

And a special thanks to the nearly 100 of you who contacted us, greatly interested but who were not able to undertake the logistics of holding a film festival in your communities this Veterans Day weekend.

Still thinking about having a film festival? Click here right now!


New Orchestra of Washington hosts World War I Armistice Concert "End of the War to End All Wars"

Joseph Turrin

On Saturday, November 10, 2018, the New Orchestra of Washington will host a concert dedicated to the Armistice Day on November 10 at 5 pm at the Church of the Epiphany, 1317 G Street Northwest Washington, DC. At the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, World War I – the Great War – ended. The New Orchestra of Washington, Washington Master Chorale, and Musica Viva NY commemorate this solemn occasion one hundred years later with a co-commission from acclaimed American composer Joseph Turrin (left), based on texts by war poets. The program also features works by Holst and and Ravel, both composers directly affected by World War I. Click here to learn more about this musical remembrance of the end of World War I.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

All About Pigeons: Andrew Blechman

Andrew Blechman

In October 19th's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 93, host Theo Mayer spoke with journalist and renowned pigeon expert Andrew Blechman (left), a name that we frequently encountered while researching pigeons for Episode 92. In the interview, Mr. Blechman answered questions about this unique bird, its long relationship with humanity, and of course, how the pigeon impacted the War that Changed the World. Click here to read a transcript of the entire interview, but be forewarned: this interview is for the birds.

Events: Maestro Rik Ghesquiere and
'The Great War in Music'

Rik Ghesquiere

In October 19th's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 94, host Theo Mayer spoke with Maestro Rik Ghesquiere, a Belgian conductor participating in a special WW1 commemorative event in Nashville on November 10th and 11th. Click here to read a transcript of the interview, edited for clarity:


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo New

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Brigadiere General Hunter Liggett

Episode #95 Highlights: Preparing for Peace & War

Host: Theo Mayer

Preparing for Peace & War - Host | @01:50

The fighting and plans continue - Mike Shuster | @08:40

America Emerges: Brig. Gen. Hunter Liggett - Dr. Edward Lengel | @12:35

Live Streaming Armistice events - Host | @19:30

Events around the nation - Host | @21:35

Pvt. Roy W. Hamm Tribute Train - Ted Lemen | @23:15

“Hello Girl” Grace Banker - Carolyn Timbie | @28:40

Century of Sound - James Errington | @36:05

Speaking WWI: Nothing to write home about - Host | @44:25

WWI WarTech: Flexing the new arsenal - Host | @45:35

Articles & Posts: The Dispatch - Host | @47:35

The Buzz: Social Media Posts - Katherine Akey | @52:05


Literature in WWI This Week

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A WWrite Blog exclusive!

WWrite asked Donald Anderson, Professor of English and Writer-in-Residence at the United States Airforce Academy, to write a post about WWI for the blog.

Anderson's Gathering Noise from My Life: A Camouflaged Memoir, was named by the Christian Science Monitor as one of “12 Electrifying Memoirs” of 2012. A few days after WWrite's request, he sent the following original piece, entitled "How Do Wars Begin?" A unique mix of poetry, prose, fiction, and history, "How Do Wars Begin?", brings together British poet Wilfred Owen, Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, the Archduke's assassin, Princip, bombs, and an expired cyanide pill to put into question not only the origins of WWI but of all contemporary conflicts.

Read Anderson's powerful literary composition "How Do Wars Begin?" at WWrite this week!


Doughboy MIA for week of Month Day

Joseph Teeters

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Monday's MIA this week is Private Joseph C. Teeters. Born June 20th, 1890 in Hopewell, Pennsylvania, Joe Teeters was drafted April 26th, 1918. He was sent to Camp Taylor, Kentucky and trained with the 24th Company, 6th Battalion, 159th Depot Brigade. He embarked for overseas service July 22nd, 1918 and ‘Over There’ was assigned to Company A, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3rd ‘Rock of the Marne’ Division. With that unit he was killed in action on October 2th, 1918 during the Meuse-Argonne Campaign. Nothing further is known of his case at this time.

Private Teeters’ case is an excellent example of why we need YOUR help. Solving these cases takes research, and research costs money. Why not give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Lapel Pin 2

WWI Centennial Commemorative Lapel Pin

 Proudly Wearing the WWI 100 Years lapel pin is a fantastic way to let folks serving in the military, along with veterans, know that we still honor those who served our country one hundred years ago.  This satin nickel lapel pin is a simple, yet meaningful, way to display your pride and remember those who sacrificed throughout our nation’s great history. A portion of the proceeds from the sale of this item goes towards funding the building of the national World War One Memorial in Washington, D.C.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


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Julian Sobieski

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

 

Julian Sobieski

Submitted by: Anthony Sobieski {grandson}

Julian Sobieski was born around 1896. Julian Sobieski served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

Private Julian Sobieski was born in Plock, Poland, on September 16th, 1896, to Leon & Antonina Sobieski. He immigrated to the United States on July 21st, 1914 through the Port of Philadelphia, PA. Julian settled in Bridesburg, the Polish section of Philadelphia. By 1917, he worked at the Disston Saw Works in the Tacony section of Philadelphia.

Julian registered for the draft on June 5th, 1917. The block 4 question on his draft card asks about Citizenship Intention: He wrote in “Will be a citizen of the USA”. My grandfather wanted to serve his adoptive country to earn his U.S. citizenship.

Julian was drafted on July 5th, 1918 and assigned to the 53rd Pioneer Infantry Regiment (PIR), HQ Company. The 53rd PIR was the old 47th New York Infantry Regiment with lineage going back to the Civil War. The 53rd PIR HQ Company had 213 men assigned, the majority of which came from New York and Pennsylvania. The men of the company were a mix of German, Italian, and Irish backgrounds, with only a few Poles, my grandfather being one of them.

Read Julian Sobieski's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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October 23, 2018

University of Illinois at Chicago sets
11 Days of World War I remembrance symposia and multimedia events

UIC Symposium

With "The War that Made Today: An Interdisciplinary Commemoration of the End of World War I" the University of Illinois at Chicago offers an incredible eleven days of World War I-themed events, to include panel discussions, symposia, exhibitions, and more. The interdisciplinary conversations and events will explore the war that transformed our contemporary world. Click here to read more about this free commemorative event.


Bells of Peace gaining momentum coast to coast with more state, city, and local proclamations issued for November 11

Bells of Peace logo vertical

The Veterans Museum in Atlantic County, New Jersey, Falls Township in Pennsylvania, and the United Methodist Church of Picture Rocks, Pennsylvania are just three of the governments and organizations who are pledging to toll bells on November 11 to honor the 4.7 million Americans who served in uniform in World War I, and the 116,516 who gave their lives in service. The Bells of Peace program asks individuals, private and religious organizations, and governments agencies at all levels to toll bells at 11:00 a.m. local time November 11 in remembrance of those who served and sacrificed. More state governors have issued proclamations in the last week asking their citizens to participate, and more are expected. So what about YOU? Click here to learn more about you and your church, school, community organization, veterans group, firehouse, or anyone else with a bell to ring can participate in this growing national commemoration event on November 11, 2018.   And don't forget: There's an app for that!


"Battle’s O'er" bagpipes project will loudly commemorate the end of WWI

Piper

The U.S. World War I Centennial Commission is supporting the efforts by DC-based bagpiper Tim Kirkpatrick, who is taking part in "Battle’s O'er", an international commemoration marking 100 years since the guns fell silent at the end of World War I. "Battle’s O'er" takes place on November 11th 2018, with events throughout the United Kingdom, Channel Islands, the Isle of Man, and at scores of locations overseas, including New Zealand, Ireland, Australia, Bermuda, France, Belgium, Canada, the United States and Germany. Click here to learn more about the "Battle’s O'er" campaign in the United States and around the world.


New "Hello Girls" Musical in NYC debut

Hello Girls play logo

The World War One Centennial Commission has officially endorsed "The Hello Girls - A new American Musical" being produced at the 59E59 Theatres in New York, New York from November 13th to December 22nd. Writer and artistic director Cara Reichel, and co-writer Peter Mills have created a musical play to bring to life the story of the Hello Girls. Reichel and Mills wanted to make this musical an immersive event true to the historical experience of what these women went through and accomplished while having the job of being a Hello Girl. Click here to learn more about the "Hello Girls" musical, and how to get tickets to see the play in New York.


Money Museum has new WWI exhibit — with a brand-new virtual exhibit online

Trenches to Treaties coin

To honor the 100th anniversary of United States involvement in World War I, the Money Museum, operated by the American Numismatic Association (ANA) and located adjacent to Colorado College, is unveiling its newest exhibit: Trenches to Treaties: World War I in Remembrance. The exhibit showcases coins and paper money from combatant nations, art medals and military decorations, as well as weapons and uniforms to illustrate the events and effects of World War I politically, economically and socially. The Money Museum also offers a remarkable new Virtual Numismatic Exhibit as a companion to Trenches to Treaties. Click here to learn more about both of these remarkable new exhibits at the Money Museum.


Nebraska football players will wear "leather" helmets to commemorate WWI

U Nebraska helmet

To commemorate Veterans Day, Memorial Stadium and the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I, the Nebraska football team on November 10 will wear uniforms intended to look like the uniforms Nebraska wore when Memorial Stadium opened in 1923. The helmet is designed to replicate a leather helmet. The primary surface appears dimpled, the way a leather helmet would be, with strap decals laid over the top. Click here to learn more about the commemorative uniforms for the Nebraska team in their game against Illinois.


Task force urges review of minorities' World War I valor awards

William Anderson

With American Legion support, a group of volunteers is proposing the first-ever review of World War I veterans who may have been denied a Medal of Honor due to racial or ethnic discrimination. Established by the U.S. World War One Centennial Commission, the Valor Medals Review Task Force is starting with the records of approximately 70 African-American soldiers -- in particular, those worthy of the nation's highest military award who may have been downgraded to a Distinguished Service Cross or received a French Croix de Guerre with palm. The task force will look at the records of other minority veterans, too, but is currently focused on African-Americans because of the legal structure of segregation at the time. Click here to learn more about the Valor Medals project and how the evaluation process will work.


Horse Heroes site honors the 1,325,000 American horses & mules that served in World War I for the United States & allies

Horse Heroes menu snip

Brooke USA, along with the World War One Centennial Commission, announce the completion of their Horse Heroes website, honoring American horses and mules who served in WWI. Horse Heroes is an extensive and meticulously researched web-based presentation documenting all aspects of the use of American horses and mules in World War One. The Horse Heroes site may be accessed on the World War One Centennial Commission website at: www.ww1cc.org/horses.  With more than 75,000 words of text and 250 images and video clips, the website is suitable as a resource for public school teachers as well as for college-level course material. Click here to learn more about this outstanding historical site.

332nd menu snip

Also recently completed on the United States World War I Centennial Commission web site is a section dedicated to remembering the men of the U.S. 332nd Infantry Regiment, and commemorating their service and sacrifice on the Italian Front in World War I. The site seeks to provide the descendants of those men with an opportunity to connect with the lives of their great-grandfathers, grandfathers, uncles or fathers by sharing the rich and complex story surrounding what those men experienced. Click here to learn more about the 332nd Infantry Regiment web site.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

Remembering Veterans:
Dr. Virginia Dilkes

Dilkes

In October 12th's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 93, host Theo Mayer spoke with commission volunteer Dr. Virginia Dilkes about her father, Charles Edward Dilkes, an Army engineer who served in France. Dr. Dilkes helped turn her father's diaries into a memoir, called Remembering World War I: An Engineer's Diary of the War,.which is now the basis for a stage production called, A Year in the Trenches, written by playwright James Rana. Click here to read a transcript of the entire interview.

Historian Corner:
Jim Leeke

Leeke

In October 12th's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 93, host Theo Mayer spoke with Jim Leeke, author of the book From The Dugouts To The Trenches: Baseball In The Great War. In the interview, he answers a series of questions about the relationship between the major leagues, the players, and the War that Changed the World. Click to read a complete transcript of this deep dive into one of the most American of pastimes, baseball.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo new

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Belgian Refugee Children

Episode #94
Highlights: Liberation in Belgium

Host: Theo Mayer

Preface: Bells of Peace - Host | @00:20

100 Years Ago: Liberation in Belgium & refugees return - Host | @03:50

Insight into Germany - Mike Shuster | @08:45

America Emerges: 29th Division in the Valley of Death - Dr. Edward Lengel | @13:20

Commission News: Some upcoming events profiled - Host | @19:45

Belgian musicians in Nashville - Maestro Rik Ghesquiere | @24:10

Historian Corner: CMH & WWI, Part II - Dr. Brian Neumann | @31:10

More about pigeons: Revered & Reviled! - Andrew Blechman | @38:30

WWI WarTech: Seeing eye dogs - Host | @45:55

WWI Memorial in Dublin GA - Scott Thompson, Keith Smith & Buddy Adams | @49:00

Speaking WWI: Devil Dogs - Host | @56:15

Articles & Posts: Dispatch Newsletter | @58:10

Buzz: The Centennial in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @60:00


Literature in WWI This Week

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Fictions of Rehabilitation 

By Mark Whalen, PhD

WWI saw a complete transformation in the ideas and institutions the government deployed to assist wounded veterans, especially in government-run healthcare.

University of Oregon English Professor, Dr. Mark Whalen, author of The Great War and the Culture of the New Negro and American Culture in the 1910sdiscusses his newbook, World War One, American Literature, and the Federal State, which examines the Homefront in the US in WWI, and specifically how American literature engaged with the fierce debates over the rights and responsibilities of citizenship, and over what the state was empowered to do, that roiled US society in the war years.

Read Dr. Whalen's insightful post, "Fictions of Rehabilitation," at WWrite this week!


Doughboy MIA for week of October 22

John Raniere

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

 

Monday's MIA this week is is Private John Raniere. This week’s MIA is very similar to last weeks MIA; in fact they were killed only one day apart and went overseas together. Born June 20th, 1892 in Grognardo, Italy, John Raniere came to America in 1916. Like last week’s man, Raniere was also a coal miner and also entered the service on September 21st, 1917, going to Camp Taylor, Kentucky for training with Company C, 151st Infantry (while last week’s man was in Company B of the 151st). He was then also transferred to Camp Shelby, Mississippi and from there went overseas with the same Camp Shelby June Automatic Replacement Draft on June 19th, 1918. He landed ‘Over There’ 12 days later and his final assignment was to Company H. 18th Infantry regiment, 1st Division with whom he was killed in action July 18th, 1918. No further details are known.

Private Raniere’s case is an excellent example of why we need YOUR help. Solving these cases takes research, and research costs money. Why not donate Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

tote bag

Canvas & Leather Tote

Function and style are combined in this lightweight and compact Canvas & Leather Tote. You can show your American pride while carrying this Made in the USA dark khaki tote. Plenty of room for keys, wallet, tablet and documents. A distressed “U.S.” imprint is prominently displayed on the bag and an exclusive fabric garment label commemorates the U.S. Centennial of World War One.

Tote features: Constructed of touch dyed canvas and lined with 400 denier nylon. Handles made of 6 Oz. top grain oil tanned leather, backed with 1” webbing. Handle is attached to bag with distinctive “X” tacks. Dimensions: 18.5” W (seam to seam) x 13.5”H x 5.0” T-bottom style gusset. A portion of the proceeds from the sale of this item will help fund the national WW1 Memorial in Washington, D.C.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

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Lawrence Reynolds

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Lawrence Reynolds

 

Pamela Jean Follstaedt Adams {Granddaughter}

Lawrence Reynolds born around 1894. Lawrence Reynolds served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1914 and the service was completed in 1920.

Story of Service

Night was descending and all the soldiers around him had fallen one by one.  They were picked off like targets at a carnival shooting game as the enemy sent shells whistling through the air toward the 9-man company.  He steadied himself behind his machine gun and waited for the next German to dare show himself in the clearing in the trees.  BOOM!  A bomb explodes and sends him hurling through the air.  BOOM!  Another bomb explodes and returns him to the bunker he coveted for shelter.  Was there help?  Were there reinforcements?  Would he survive?

This was the long night of May 8, 1918, Lawrence Reynolds had in World War I that awarded him a purple heart and a silver star.  Lawrence held the German forces away through the evening, by himself, until his buddies came to look for the squad in the morning and rescued him.  By keeping the Germans away he held the field for the allies and prevented a full attack by the Germans.

Read Lawrence Reynolds's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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